Animated video for students (and parents/guardians) explaining all there is to know about the Secondary School Vaccine Program consent card.

Immunisation consent cards:  what you need to know

[music]

>> Narrator: Immunisation consent cards: what you need to know.

>> Student: How come I’ve been given this immunisation consent card to take home from school?

>> Narrator: Kids at secondary school are offered vaccines because the protection from some of the vaccines you had when you were little wears off. You need a booster dose of some vaccines to keep protected from serious diseases. Now that you are older there are some diseases which you are more likely to be exposed to, so it makes sense to protect yourself from these diseases now. To get these vaccines for free at school your Mum or Dad or carer need to give their consent in writing. That’s why you’ve been given the consent card.

>> Student: What do I need to do with this consent card?

>> Narrator: Take it home and give it to your Mum or Dad or carer. They need to read it and fill it in. If you have any questions or worries about the vaccine or the injection talk about them with your Mum, Dad or carer and get more information from reliable sources. The Immune Hero website has reliable information for you and for your parents. If you have specific questions, talk to your doctor or immunisation nurse from your local council as they can help your family make an informed decision. Sometimes being able to talk through your worries helps you feel more comfortable about having the vaccine. Once your mum or dad or carer have completed and signed the card, return it to school by the due date.

>> Student: Why should I get these vaccines at school?

>> Narrator: Vaccines cost a lot of money. The cost for a course of the human papillomavirus vaccines is around $450, the chickenpox vaccine is $60 and the dTp vaccine is around $50. The government funds these vaccines so you can access them free of charge at particular ages and year levels in secondary school. If you get the vaccines at school not only are you protecting your health at the best time, your parents are saving a lot of money!  You are also playing your part by helping to protect those in the community who may be unable to receive vaccines themselves like newborn babies. You can also get the vaccine free at your doctor if you are the right age but you may have to pay a doctor’s visit fee.

>> Student: What is the consent for?

>> Narrator: The vaccines that are recommended for secondary school aged kids include:

  • at least one dose of the chickenpox vaccine
  • one dose of the dTp vaccine for protection against diphtheria, Tetanus and pertussis
  • three doses of human papillomavirus vaccine for protection against genital warts and some forms of genital cancers

Check the consent card and Immune Hero website to find out which year level and ages are eligible to receive thesevaccines free of charge at school.

>> Student: What if my parents don’t want me to get the vaccines?

>> Narrator: There is a place on the consent card where they can indicate this. You still need to give the completed cards back to school even if you aren’t going to have the vaccines. This is so that your school can be sure that all parents and caregivers have received this important information.

>> Student: Where can I go for good information about vaccines and immunisation?

>> Narrator: The Immune Hero website has a range of information available about vaccination for teenagers, parents and schools including fun and interactive games and videos. Another reliable source is the Victorian Government’s Better Health Channel. It has quality-assured, up-to-date fact sheets on immunisation, including information about how vaccines work and myths and facts about immunisation. And don’t forget to take that consent card out of your school bag!